Psychosis

Psychosis is a mental health problem that causes people to perceive or interpret things differently from those around them. This might involve hallucinations or delusions.

The two main symptoms of psychosis are:

  • hallucinations – where a person hears, sees and, in some cases, feels, smells or tastes things that aren’t there; a common hallucination is hearing voices
  • delusions – where a person believes things that, when examined rationally, are obviously untrue – for example, thinking your next door neighbour is planning to kill you

The combination of hallucinations and delusional thinking can often severely disrupt perception, thinking, emotion and behaviour.

Experiencing the symptoms of psychosis is often referred to as having a psychotic episode.

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Psychosis/Pages/Introduction.aspx

This information from the National Health Service in the UK is one of many websites for understanding psychosis and psychotic disorders.  Other helpful websites include:

Black Dog Institute:  http://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/public/bipolardisorder/bipolardisorderexplained/index.cfm

Schizophrenia and Related Disorders Alliance of America:  http://www.sardaa.org/resources/about-schizophrenia/

Supporting Families in Mental Illness New Zealand:  http://www.supportingfamilies.org.nz/resources/mental-health-info/psychosis.aspx

Disclaimer:

Information and resources available on this website are not a substitute for professional medical care by a qualified doctor (such as your General Practitioner) or other health care professional, and medical professionals should always use their own clinical judgement before relying upon this information.  All Nations Christian Mental Health Association (ANCMHA) is not responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any form of damages whatsoever resulting from the use (or misuse) of information contained in or implied by the information on this site.